Immigrant Visa Information

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Overview

In general, a person who wishes to immigrate to the United States must have a petition approved by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) before applying for an immigrant visa. The petition is filed either by a qualified relative or a potential employer at a USCIS office in the United States. Specific information about filing immigrant petitions is available on the USCIS website. An individual with an approved petition and a priority date that is current for processing (when applicable) is eligible to apply for an immigrant visa or K nonimmigrant visa.

Petitions

Effective August 15, 2011, petitioners residing in Nicaragua, where USCIS does not have a public counter presence, must file their Forms I-130 by mail with the USCIS Chicago lockbox. U.S. Embassies that do not have a USCIS presence will only be able to accept and process Forms I-130 in exceptional circumstances, as outlined below. Forms I-130 that were properly filed at an Embassy overseas where USCIS does not have a presence before August 15, 2011, will not be affected by this change.

USCIS Chicago Lockbox addresses for regular mail deliveries:
USCIS
P.O. Box 804625
Chicago, IL 60680-4107

USCIS Chicago Lockbox address for express mail and courier deliveries:
USCIS
Attn: I-130
131 South Dearborn-3rd Floor
Chicago, IL 60603-5517

For additional information about how to file a Form I-130 with the USCIS Chicago lockbox, visit the USCIS website at http://www.uscis.gov or contact USCIS by telephone in the U.S. at 1-800-375-5283

USCIS Immigrant Fee

Effective December 23, 2016, all individuals issued immigrant visas overseas must pay a $220.00 USCIS Immigrant Fee before traveling to the United States. Only prospective adoptive parents whose child(ren) is/are entering the United States under either the Orphan or Hague Process, Iraqi and Afghan special immigrants who were employed by the U.S. government, returning residents, and those issued K visas are exempt from the new fee. The below USCIS website has more details on the new fee, including contact information for USCIS, if there are further questions: www.USCIS.gov/immigrantfee.

Exceptional Filing

Beginning August 15, 2011, petitioners who believe their situation merits an exception may request the Consular Section to accept the filing. Each request will be evaluated individually.

A petitioner seeking to file a Form I-130 should contact the Consular Section to request consideration for exception and explain the circumstances in detail. The Consular Section will then relay the request for an exception to the USCIS field office with jurisdiction over the Embassy. The determination of whether the case presents exceptional circumstances which warrant an exception to the general filing process will be made by USCIS. USCIS will publish guidance on the circumstances that may qualify as exceptional on their website.

Embassy Appointment

If you have an interview date, you must appear at the Embassy on the date of your appointment. Please read about security restrictions at the Embassy that describe what you can and cannot bring with you to your interview. You should bring your appointment letter and the documents required for your visa class.

Returning Residents-SB1

Please find below the instructions to qualify for a returning resident status:

Post Returning Residents- SB1 requirements.

Lost/stolen/mutilated and expired resident card (I-551) – Boarding Foil

If your Legal Permanent Resident card has been lost, stolen, or mutilated, and you have not remained outside of the U.S. for more than one year and wish to return to the U.S., you may come in person to the U.S. Embassy any Tuesday or Thursday (except Nicaraguan or US holidays) at 11:00am to apply for a boarding foil.   You will need to be prepared with the following:

Appointment Checklist:

  • Fill out the form I-131A, Application for Travel Document, available on the USCIS web site: https://www.uscis.gov/i-131a
  • Pay the $575 fee on line (see link below) and print the receipt
    USCIS ELIS: https://public-prod-elis2.uscis.dhs.gov/efile/app/app/travel/#!/
  • A photocopy of the lost resident card (if available) or alien registration number (A-Number). If you do not know your alien registration number, follow the instructions below to obtain it.
  • The mutilated resident card (if applicable).
  • Bearers of conditional legal permanent resident cards that are now expired (CR1, CR2, CR6, CF1, among others) who do not have the original Notice of Action indicating an extension of status, need to provide proof that the I-751, Petition to Remove Condition of residence, has been filed with USCIS.
  • Your valid passport.
  • One 2”x2”photo, in color with a white background
  • Police record if the resident card was lost/stolen.
  • Nicaraguan Migratory Movement if the resident card was lost/stolen.
  • Airplane ticket/boarding pass used to come to Nicaragua.

How to find your A – Number:
https://www.uscis.gov/file-online/immigrant-fee-payment-tips-finding-your-number-and-dos-case-id

Post Interview:

If your application is accepted and approved, the Consular Officer will go through other verification steps.  This process can take up to two (2) weeks to complete.  During this process we are not able to expedite your request.  Once this process is completed you will receive a boarding visa in your passport valid for up to 30 days which will only be good for one entry into the United States.  For more information about this process, please visit: https://www.uscis.gov/news/alerts/form-i-131a-now-available

Persons with a lost, mutilated, expired, or stolen card must request a replacement card with a USCIS office by submitting a Form I-90 upon return to the US.   For more information about this process please visit https://www.uscis.gov/i-90.  USCIS will charge a fee to replace your card.

Please note that neither USCIS nor the Embassy will issue a refund for any fees paid, regardless of the decision on the application.

Expired resident card

Persons whose resident cards have expired,  and have not remained outside of the U.S. for longer than one year and wish to return, do NOT require a boarding foil, provided:

  • The expired Permanent Resident Card had a 10-year validation period;
  • The Permanent Resident Card with a 2-year expiration date had an accompanying Form I-797, Notice of Action, indicating the status had been extended; or
  • Orders from the U.S. Government (civilian or military) showing time spent outside the U.S. was on official government business.

If any of the above applies, please consult with your air carrier prior to paying for Form I-131A.

FAQ for IV

On this section:


FAQ IV- USCIS IMMIGRANT VISA FEE

  1. What is the USCIS Immigrant fee and where to pay it?

Q.1 What is the USCIS Immigrant fee and where to pay it?

As a recipient of an immigrant visa from the U.S. Department of State, you are required to pay $220 USD to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The USCIS Immigrant Fee covers the costs USCIS incurs to process, file and maintain the immigrant visa package as well as produce and issue documents, including the Permanent Residence Card (commonly referred to as the Green Card).

You must pay the USCIS Immigrant Fee online using the USCIS Electronic Immigration System (USCIS ELIS) after you receive your immigrant visa package from the Department of State and before you depart for the United States. You will not receive your Green Card until you have paid the USCIS Immigrant Fee.

You may pay for yourself and for members of your family who will live with you in the United States. If you pay for other family members, you must have their Alien Registration Number (A-Number) and Department of State (DOS) Case ID available.

You will pay the fee by going to http://www.USCIS.gov/ImmigrantFee, clicking on the link to the USCIS intake page on Pay.gov, answering the questions on the USCIS intake page, and providing your checking account, debit, or credit card information. Because checking payments must be drawn on a U.S. bank, someone else may pay the USCIS Immigrant Fee on your behalf.

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FAQ IV- GENERAL QUESTIONS

  1. How does the National Visa Center fit into the U.S. immigration process?
  2. How do I know if my priority date meets the most recent qualifying date? And what does that mean?
  3. How do I know what my priority date is?
  4. I received a package 4 for immigrant visa applicants from National Visa Center. What do I do now?
  5. How long should I expect to be at the Consular Section on the day of my visa interview?
  6. What is the principal beneficiary of a petition and what is a derivative beneficiary?
  7. Should I get a lawyer to help me with my case?
  8. I received a CR-1 or CR-2 immigrant visa. What does that mean?
  9. What does the Child Citizenship Act do?
  10. The person who filed the petition on my behalf is not working. Does he or she still need to submit an Affidavit of Support?

Q.1 How does the National Visa Center fit into the U.S. immigration process?

After the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) approve your immigrant visa petition, the USCIS forwards your petition to the National Visa Center (NVC) for immigrant visa pre-processing at the correct time.  When your petition becomes current, or is likely to become current within one year, the NVC initiates immigrant visa pre-processing, including collecting visa fees, forms, and documents from sponsors (petitioners) and immigrant visa applicant(s).

Immediate relative categories do not have yearly numerical limits, however, family preference and employment immigrant categories have numerical limits each year; and therefore, wait times are involved, which can be lengthy.

For more information, please visit: www.travel.state.gov

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Q.2 How do I know if my priority date meets the most recent qualifying date? And what does that mean?

If your priority date is earlier than the qualifying date for your visa class and your foreign state chargeability, your priority date meets the most recent qualifying date and your petition is ready to begin processing at the NVC. Learn more by reviewing the visa bulletin.

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Q.3 How do I know what my priority date is?

The USCIS assigned your immigrant visa petition a priority date when you filed it with USCIS. If you are unsure of your Priority Date, you should refer to the Approval Notice that you received from the USCIS. 

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Q.4 I received a package 4 for immigrant visa applicants from National Visa Center.  what do I do now?

Please follow the instructions in the Appointment Package for Immigrant Visa Applicants step by step.  Failure to do so could result in a delay in your case and could even cause you to lose your chance to live and work in the U.S.

The consular officer cannot decide whether or not to issue you an immigrant visa until you formally apply and are interviewed.  Therefore, we strongly recommend that you NOT make non-refundable flight arrangements or other travel plans until and unless you actually receive your visa.

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Q.5 How long should I expect to be at the Consular Section on the day of my visa interview?

It is not possible for us to predict exactly how long you will be at the Consular Section when you apply for an immigrant visa.  We interview applicants as efficiently as possible consistent with reasoned, legally supportable decisions; however, you should be patient as some applicants may be at our office until 12:00 pm.

We make every attempt to interview elderly applicants, applicants with infants, and other applicants with special needs early in the day.  If you have a special need that is not apparent, please mention it during the initial screening interview so that we can expedite your interview with the consular officer. 

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Q.6 What is the principal beneficiary of a petition and what is a derivative beneficiary?

In a family-based immigrant visa case, the principal beneficiary of a petition is the person on whose behalf the petition was filed, that is, the person listed on the right side of the front of Form I-130 (Petition for Alien Relative).  A derivative beneficiary is the spouse or child of the principal beneficiary.  A preference family-based case may have many derivative beneficiaries in addition to the principal beneficiary, and all of the beneficiaries (principal and derivatives) share the same petition and the same case number.  There are no derivative beneficiaries in immediate relative family-based cases, which mean that each applicant must have his or her own petition and individual case number. 

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Q.7 Should I get a lawyer to help me with my case?

Most applicants for immigrant visas do not require legal counsel.  The decision as to whether or not to hire a lawyer or other representative is yours alone.  We cannot tell you whether or not to obtain representation, nor can we recommend any specific lawyers.  If you do hire a lawyer or other representative, that person may accompany you to your visa interview but may not answer questions on your behalf.  You, the applicant, must answer the consular officer’s questions.

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Q.8 I received a CR-1 or CR-2 immigrant visa.  What does that mean?

You and the petitioner must file a Form I-751 (Petition to Remove the Conditions on Residence) with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Service Center in the U.S. with jurisdiction over your state of residence within the 90-day period immediately preceding the second anniversary of the date you were first admitted to the U.S. as a conditional permanent resident.  If the I-751 is not filed within this period, your conditional permanent resident status will be terminated automatically and you will be subject to deportation from the U.S. 

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Q.9 What does the Child Citizenship Act do?

The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 is a law that amended Section 320 of the Immigration and Nationality Act to confer automatic U.S. citizenship upon certain categories of children born abroad upon their admission to the United States as a Legal Permanent Resident. 

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Q.10 The person who filed the petition on my behalf is not working.  Does he or she still need to submit an Affidavit of Support?

Yes.  If you are subject to the I-864 (Affidavit of Support under Section 213A of the Act) requirement, as almost all immigrant visa applicants in Nicaragua are, the petitioner must submit an I-864 for you.  This requirement applies even if the petitioner is not working or is working but does not earn enough money to support you.  In these circumstances, your petitioner may find a joint sponsor who is willing to file an I-864 for you, or he or she may have a household member who is willing to file a Form I-864A (Contract between Sponsor and Household Member).

Remember that every I-864 and I-864A must be accompanied by proof that the filer is a U.S. Citizen or Legal Permanent Resident, as well as the most recent U.S. tax returns.  If the petitioner is not working, he or she must state this on the I-864.  If the person has not filed a U.S. tax return, regardless of the reason, he or she must explain in writing why not. 

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FAQ IV- COMMON QUESTIONS/SITUATIONS

  1. Do I have to become a legal permanent resident before my child can be issued an immigrant visa?
  2. What if I get married after I receive my immigrant visa but before I am admitted to the United States as a Legal Permanent Resident?
  3. What happens if the petitioner dies before the principal beneficiary has immigrated to the United States?
  4. What happens if the petitioner dies after the principal beneficiary has immigrated to the U.S.?
  5. What happens to the derivative beneficiary's case if the principal beneficiary dies?
  6. What about military service once I arrive in the U.S.?
  7. My visa was refused. Why did this happen and what do I do now?
  8. What is a waiver and how do I get one?
  9. What shall I do if the consular officer suggested DNA testing? What is that?
  10. Why do you have to take my fingerprints, and how much does it cost?
  11. I was arrested in the past. What should I do?
  12. What is a fiancé (K-1) visa?
  13. I think I am a legal permanent resident, but I have been out of the United States for one year or longer.  I want to return to live in the U.S.  What do I do?
  14. I am a legal permanent resident but my “green card” was lost/stolen/mutilated/expired while I was visiting Nicaragua. 
  15. I have a valid/ expired/ resident card (green card), could I apply for visitor visa? Or will abandoning my residency status/ resident card (green card) help me get a visitor visa?
  16. I still have immigrant visa questions.  How can I find more information?
  17. I have feedback to share concerning the immigrant visa process.  How do I submit my comments to your office?
  18. I received my immigrant visa and am about to move to the United States. Where can I get more information about living in the United States?

Q.1 Do I have to become a Legal Permanent Resident before my child can be issued an immigrant visa?

No. There is no requirement that you ever become a Legal Permanent Resident. However, in order for your child to qualify as your spouse's stepchild, the consular officer must be convinced that your marriage is legitimate for immigration purposes. The most direct way for the consular officer to know that the marriage is bona fide is for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services of the Department of Homeland Security to have adjusted your status to that of Legal Permanent Resident.  If you are not yet a Legal Permanent Resident, the consular officer may require alternative evidence (e.g., joint rental agreements, bank statements, phone bills, photographs, etc.).  You and your spouse may even be asked to come to the U.S. Embassy for an interview with the consular officer. 

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Q.2 What if I get married after I receive my immigrant visa but before I am admitted to the United States as a Legal Permanent Resident?

If you are issued an immigrant visa under a category that requires you to be unmarried, and you marry after receiving the visa but before being admitted to the United States, you will be subject to exclusion from the United States. If you have questions about your particular situation, please contact us.

Please read Form OF-237 (Statement of Marriageable Age Applicant).

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Q.3 What happens if the petitioner dies before the principal beneficiary has immigrated to the United States?

If the petitioner dies before the principal beneficiary has immigrated to the U.S., the petition is automatically revoked pursuant to 8 CFR 205.1(a)(3).  This means that the consular officer will not be able to issue a visa to any of the beneficiaries of the petition and will be required to return the petition to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

If there are compelling humanitarian circumstances, the applicant may contact directly the USCIS office that approved the petition to request that it be reinstated for humanitarian reasons.  If USCIS reinstates the petition, the consular officer will contact the applicant(s) soon thereafter.

Please see 9 FAM 42.42 PN2 for more information on humanitarian reinstatement.

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Q.4 What happens if the petitioner dies after the principal beneficiary has immigrated to the U.S.?

Eligibility of derivative applicants seeking to follow to join a principal beneficiary who has already acquired Legal Permanent Resident status is dependent on the continuing legal permanent resident status of the principal, not on the status of the petitioner.  Therefore, if the petitioner dies after the principal applicant has already become a Legal Permanent Resident and one or more derivative applicants seek to follow to join the principal applicant, the derivatives retain eligibility to follow to join despite the death of the petitioner.

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Q.5 What happens to the derivative beneficiary´s case if the principal beneficiary dies?

If the principal beneficiary dies at any time before the derivative beneficiary immigrates to the U.S., the consular officer will not be able to issue a visa to the derivative beneficiary.  Humanitarian reinstatement does not apply in such a case, though humanitarian parole may be an option. 

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Q.6 What about military service once I arrive in the U.S.?

If you are a man and are between 18 and 26 years old, you must register with the U.S. Selective Service System within 30 days after you enter the U.S.  Registration is for conscription into military service in an emergency mobilization of the armed forces.  There is no conscription at this time.

To register, go to the nearest United States Post Office, obtain a registration form, fill in the information requested and hand the completed form to the postal clerk.  Within 90 days, you should receive a Registration Acknowledgement postcard from Selective Service.  If you do not hear from Selective Service within this period, it is important that you contact Selective Service to verify your registration status. Alternatively, you may register online. You may also verify your registration status online.

On the day of your immigrant visa appointment, you will be required to sign Form DS-1810 (Notice of Duty to Register with U.S. Selective Service System) acknowledging that you understand your obligation to register with Selective Service.

Legal permanent residents, male or female, may join the U.S. military as enlisted personnel. For more information please contact: U.S. ArmyU.S. NavyU.S. Air ForceU.S. Marine Corps; or U.S. Coast Guard.

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Q.7 My visa was refused.  Why did this happen and what do I do now?

U.S. consular officers are only allowed to issue immigrant visas to those applicants who qualify under the law.  A visa can be refused for a variety of reasons.  For example, your immigrant visa could be denied if you have a criminal record, if you lie during your visa interview, if you lived in the U.S. without permission, or if your economic documents are insufficient.  There are many other possible reasons that a visa can be refused.  The consular officer who denies an immigrant visa provides a written explanation describing under what section of the law the visa was refused.

Some immigrant visa refusals may be overcome with additional evidence -- for example, 212(a)(4) public charge.  Some refusals require a waiver from the Department of Homeland Security -- for example, 212(a)(9)(B) unlawful presence -- before a visa can be issued.  Some refusals are absolutely permanent -- for example, 212(a)(2)(C) controlled substance trafficker.

On the day of your immigrant visa appointment, the consular officer will interview you and either will approve your visa or deny it.  If the consular officer approves your visa, you will usually receive the visa package within the next week.  If the visa is refused, the consular officer will give you a refusal sheet listing the section of law under which your visa was refused.  The letter will also give you detailed instructions on what to do next.  It is very important that you follow the instructions exactly.  If you do not follow the instructions, you can be sure that your case will be delayed, and it is possible that you will lose your chance to live and work in the U.S.  Please contact us if you do not understand the instructions in the letter.  We will be glad to answer your questions.

Consular officers base their decisions solely on the law, regulations, and Department of State policy.  If you come to the Immigrant Visa Unit prepared and follow the consular officer’s directions completely, you will be much more likely to receive your immigrant visa.

A word of caution -- Form I-130 (Petition for Alien Relative) contains the following warning: “The Department of Homeland Security investigates claimed relationships and verifies the validity of documents. The Department of Homeland Security seeks criminal prosecutions when family relationships are falsified to obtain visas. Penalties: You may, by law be imprisoned for not more than five years, or fined $250,000, or both, for entering into a marriage contract for the purpose of evading any provision of the immigration laws and you may be fined up to $10,000 or imprisoned up to five years or both, for knowingly and willfully falsifying or concealing a material fact or using any false document in submitting this petition.”

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Q.8 What is the waiver and how do I get one?

A waiver is a special authorization granted by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to put aside ineligibility.  As explained in the answer to "My visa was refused. Why did this happen and what do I do now?” some refusals require a waiver before a visa can be issued.  Some frequently seen refusals at the Immigrant Visa Unit in Managua that require waivers are 212(a)(6)(C)(i) for misrepresentation and 212(a)(9)(B) for unlawful presence.

In order to apply for a waiver, you must submit a Form I-601 (Waiver of Ground of Excludability) to the Immigrant Visa Unit, along with the non-refundable waiver application fee.  In addition, some waivers require you to show that your exclusion from the U.S. would cause extreme hardship to your U.S. Citizen or Legal Permanent Resident spouse, parent, son or daughter.  And some waivers require action by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a medical doctor.  There may also be other requirements.  The consular officer will tell you whether a waiver is available in your case and, if so, will give you instructions on how to apply.

Remember that DHS retains sole authority to approve or deny waivers and that waivers are discretionary, for more information on how to apply and waiver fee, please visit: USCIS.

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Q.9 What shall I do if the consular officer suggested DNA testing? What is that?

Please follow the instructions provided by the consular officer at the conclusion of the interview.

A DNA test is a genetic/parentage test in conjunction with your citizenship or immigration case. You should know that testing can be expensive. All expenses associated with the testing are the responsibility of the individual tested. For this reason it is requested only when no other options appear to be available. While we cannot require you to undergo this testing: we may not be able to continue processing your case without it.

In citizenship cases most laws require a blood relationship regardless of marital status to confer U.S. citizenship. Therefore, though the offspring of a valid marriage are generally presumed to be the issue of married parties, in cases where there is doubt testing may be required. Similarly, in immigration cases where a blood relationship is required (e.g. no step child relationship exists), testing may be necessary if the parentage cannot be satisfactorily documented through other means.

The Department of State requires DNA testing for visa and citizenship purposes are done by a lab that is accredited by the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB). Please consult AABB website the for a listing of accredited labs.


If you want more information please check the following link:  https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/immigrate/family/dna-test-procedures.html

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Q.10 Why do you have to take my fingerprints, and how much does it cost?

A strict background check has long been required for all visa applicants.  As part of this check, we take electronic fingerprints of many of our applicants on the day of the visa interview.  There is no additional charge for these electronic fingerprints. 
 

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Q.11 I was arrested in the past.  What should I do?

If you have ever been arrested for any reason, at any time and in any country, you must tell the consular officer during your immigrant visa interview.  Question 31 of Form DS-230 (Application for Immigrant Visa and Alien Registration) asks you whether you have ever been arrested. You must answer this question truthfully, and you must explain the details of your situation.

Bring to your visa interview all documentation concerning any and all arrests, even if the charges were dropped or you were acquitted, pardoned or given amnesty.  In addition, you must provide a copy of the statute under which you were arrested and a translation of the statute into English.  The consular officer will review the evidence and make a decision as to whether or not you are eligible for a visa. 

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Q.12 What is a fiancé (K-1) visa?

A fiancé visa (or K-1 visa) is technically a non immigrant visa.  The fiancé visa is for foreigners who wish to marry a U.S. citizen in the United States and then become legal permanent residents without having to leave the United States. K-2 visas are for the children of K-1 applicants.
 

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Q.13 I think I am a legal permanent resident, but I have been out of the United States for one year or longer.  I want to return to live in the U.S. What do I do?

It is possible that you may qualify for returning resident status.  Returning resident status is for an alien who meets the following requirements:

  • Was a lawfully admitted permanent resident of the United States at the time of departure
  • At the time of departure, had the intention of returning to the United States
  • While residing abroad, did not abandon the intention of returning to the United States
  • Is returning from a temporary residence abroad; or if the stay was protracted, this was caused by reasons beyond his or her control.

To apply for returning resident status, please visit the link:  Apply for a U.S. Visa | Immigrant Visa Information - Nicaragua (English).

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Q.14 I am a legal permanent resident but my "green card" was lost/stolen/mutilated/expired while I was visiting Nicaragua. What do I do?

If you have been out of the U.S. for less than one year and your permanent resident card (often called a “green card”) was lost/stolen/expired, you can visit the U.S. Embassy in Managua any Tuesday or Thursday at 11:00 am to get more information on how to proceed. . 
 

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Q.15 I have a valid/expired/resident card (green card), could I apply for visitor visa? or will abandoning my residency status/resident card (green card) help me get a visitor visa?

If you are legal permanent resident or in a possession of a valid/ expired resident card (green card) and no longer interested in living in US, but would like to visit the US for a short time, you need to apply for a visitor visa. Visit the following link; , in order to get the information. You will also need to fill out the (print it out and bring it to your consular interview day) in order to formally abandon your residency status/resident card. Note: Abandoning your residency status/resident card is not a guarantee that you will be approved for a visitor visa.

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Q.16 I still have immigrant visa questions.  How can I find more information?

If you already have a pending immigrant visa case and can supply us with the MNG number, you may direct specific questions about existing cases to us by emailing to: support-nicaragua@ustraveldocs.com   The MNG number should be in the subject line of your email followed by the general nature of your inquiry (e.g., fiancé visa, affidavit of support, etc.).  We will try to respond to your inquiry within three working days.
 

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Q.17 I have feedback to share concerning the immigrant visa process.  How do I submit my comments to your office?

The Immigrant Visa Unit welcomes your comments, complaints, compliments and suggestions concerning any and all aspects of the immigrant visa process, including the treatment you receive from our employees.  The best way to send us your feedback is by emailing us at support-nicaragua@ustraveldocs.com

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Q.18 I received my immigrant visa and am about to move to the United States.  Where can I get more information about living in the United States?

Please see . This booklet, produced by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, contains a wealth of information on topics such as registering your child for school, maintaining your immigrant status, finding a job and becoming a U.S. citizen.

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